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Updated: Jan 24, 2020

Find out in "Night of the Full Moon," coming SOON to Amazon Kindle!


Katheryn Winnick as Lagertha, Vikings; (credit: History Channel)


The last time Marnin loved a woman, he lost his right hand and his freedom.


Marnin, slave and captive in evil Rahesh, has survived by keeping his head down and avoiding trouble, but trouble comes looking for him. Eliana, a female soldier from Auriga, which lost the latest war with Rahesh, has escaped captivity and taken refuge in one of Marnin's master's warehouses - where Marnin finds her. The extent of her injuries tugs at his heart, but the law requires something brutal. Torn between right and wrong, Marnin finds himself forced to make the most painful decision of his life.


Find out what happens at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0844WW7BT/

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  • author.jmulcahy@gmail.com



With the passing of Christopher Tolkien, son of J.R.R. Tolkien, we lost a direct connection to the great author and a source of valuable insights into Tolkien's life work. I consider The Lord of the Rings to be one of the great masterworks of literature.


When The History of Middle Earth books began to appear, I bought them faithfully. The four War of the Ring volumes provide a valuable insight into the making of a masterpiece. Reading the early drafts is fascinating--and humbling. Humbling for me as a writer to read stuff that is way better than anything I could ever read IN MY LIFE, and realize that that's stuff he threw away! It wasn't good enough!


What reading experience(s) have you had that evoked humility? Let me know at jack@authorjackmulcahy.com or author.jmulcahy@gmail.com.



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  • author.jmulcahy@gmail.com

Updated: Jan 19, 2020


The current issue of Writer's Digest has an article called "Openings That Kill It," discussing how to get your story off with a bang. One of the examples featured is from another author I admire, John D. MacDonald, author of the popular Travis McGee series. The book quoted is Darker Than Amber (1966), and the first line is this:


We were about to give up and call it a night when somebody dropped the girl off the bridge.


In just 19 words, JDM establishes the story problem and sets up the whole book! As the WD author's comment says, "How could you possibly stop reading this book?"



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